Fire Prevention Week Luncheon: Oct. 19

2017_firefighter_luncheon

Fox Valley Labor News staff reports
Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017

MT. PROSPECT — Join hundreds of members from the fire service and beyond at the 77th annual Fire Prevention Week Luncheon, hosted by the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance. Get your tickets at the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance website.

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The Fire Prevention Week Luncheon includes a guest presenter, gourmet lunch and networking opportunities. The event also highlights and honors those who have gone above and beyond in fire safety and burn prevention, as each year the IFSA receives nominations and presents awards for various categories.

9/11 changed the way we lived and will be a day forever remembered in the fire service industry – and especially for the FDNY. Sal Cassano will discuss the impact of 9/11 on the department he oversaw, what lessons were learned and most importantly, how the department and the city moved on. While there was a focus to rebuild, the FDNY made sure it increased interaction with the public and placed a renewed emphasis on fire prevention and education.

Cassano served as the 32nd Fire Commissioner in the 151-year history of the New York Fire Department (FDNY), leading the United States’ largest fire department with more than 16,000 fire, EMS, and civilian members and an annual budget of $1.6 billion.

Commissioner Cassano spent more than 44 years in the FDNY and held every uniformed rank prior to his appointment by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg in January, 2010. Commissioner Cassano served as the FDNY’s Chief of Department — the highest-ranking uniformed officer — from 2006-10, overseeing many of the agency’s most important bureaus including Fire & EMS Operations, Training, Safety, Fire Prevention, and Communications.

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From 2001-06, he served as Chief of Operations — a position to which he was appointed immediately after Sept. 11, 2001. Both as Chief of Operations and Chief of Department, Commissioner Cassano played a crucial role in rebuilding the department in the wake of September 11 and the loss of 343 members of the department.

In the years that followed, more than 6,800 new firefighters were hired and more than 6,000 others were promoted to various officer ranks as the department went through a difficult but remarkable resurgence. Under his leadership, the FDNY became better equipped, trained, and prepared than ever before in its history, and achieved unprecedented success with the fewest civilian fire fatalities ever and the fastest response times on records.

Headed in the wrong direction

Painters District Council 14

Fox Valley Labor News staff reports
Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017

CHICAGO — The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) is subcontracting the mylar wrapping of buses, train cars and platform advertising to a non-signatory, New York-based Intersection Media, which specializes in digital, narrative, branded content and documentary projects.

Painters District Council 14

Organized labor held a labor rally Oct. 1 against the Chicago Transit Authority, which is subcontracting the mylar wrapping of buses, train and platform advertising to New York-based Intersection Media. Painters District Council 14 says mylar wrapping falls under its jurisdiction. Photo courtesy of Painters District Council 14

According to Painters District Council 14 (PDC 14), the CTA is claiming Intersection Media’s work is NOT construction work, and therefore, does not fall under the jurisdiction of PDC 14.

Painters District Council 14

Painters District Council 14 members rally Oct. 1 against the CTA in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Painters District Council 14

The union disagrees, saying the work in question falls under PDC 14’s jurisdiction — and has for more than 11 years. The union said mylar wrapping is merely a different form of paint or protective coating.

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Since early September, PDC 14 has been protesting Intersection Media, but the union ramped up its efforts Oct. 1 with a large labor rally, which coincided with the CTA’s 70th Anniversary celebration at Daley Plaza.

PDC 14 has a Project Labor Agreement with the CTA, which the CTA is refusing to honor with the union.

Voice your displeasure with the CTA by contacting them:
Phone: 888-968-7282
Online: Web: CTA feedback and Facebook

Justice Spotlight: Wealthy attack worker freedom

janus_v_AFSCME

The forces behind this case know that by joining together in strong unions, working people are able to win the power and voice they need to level the economic and political playing field. However, the people behind this case simply do not believe working people deserve the same freedoms they have: To negotiate a fair return on their work.

Fox Valley Labor News staff reports
Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017

In a rigged economy, workers say the freedom to come together in strong unions is more important than ever

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Supreme Court announced it would decide Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, a lawsuit which aims to take away the freedom of working people to join together in strong unions to speak up for themselves and their communities.

Janus — which the nation’s highest court will take up in the October 2017-June 2018 term — is a blatantly political and well-funded plot to use the highest court in the land to further rig the economic rules against everyday working people.

janus_v_AFSCME

The U.S. Supreme Court will take up the anti-union Janus case this term. The case is a blatant, years-long campaign to weaken unions. The case started with an overt political attempt by Illinois’ Republican billionaire Gov. Bruce Rauner to attack public service workers through the courts. Photo courtesy of AFSCME Council 31

The billionaires and corporate special interests funding this case view unions as a threat to their power, so they are trying to get the U.S. Supreme Court to rig the system even more in favor of those already at the top. This case started right here in Illinois when billionaire Illinois Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner attacked public service workers through the courts.

Rauner originated this case in a lawsuit he filed against AFSCME Council 31 to try to weaken the union by banning Fair Share fees in state government.

janus_v_AFSCME

When the federal court said Rauner didn’t have standing to bring such a suit, he found a lone state employee — Mark Janus — to allow the legal challenge to proceed in his name.

AFSCME Council 31 Executive Director Roberta Lynch said billionaires like Rauner are trying to rig the rules to take more power and influence for themselves.

“The forces behind this case know that by joining together in strong unions, working people have the voice they need to level the economic and political playing field.”

The merits of the case are clear. Since 1977, a Supreme Court case called Abood v. Detroit Board of Education has effectively governed labor relations between public sector employees and employers, allowing employers and employees the freedom to determine labor policies that best serve the public.

janus_v_AFSCME

When reviewing the legal merits of Janus, it is clear this attempt to manipulate the court against working people should be rejected.

AFSCME, along with three other public service unions — the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), the National Education Association (NEA) and the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) – issued a joint statement opposing Janus.

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AFSCME President Lee Saunders said the merits of the case, 40 years of Supreme Court precedent and sound law, are on organized labor’s side.

“This case is another example of corporate interests using their power and influence to launch a political attack on working people and rig the rules of the economy in their own favor. When working people are able to join strong unions, they have the strength in numbers they need to fight for the freedoms they deserve, like access to quality health care, retirement security and time off work to care for a loved one,” Saunders added.

Here to serve union members

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Jennifer Rice Managing Editor

By Jennifer Rice
Managing Editor
Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017
Email Jennifer Rice at: jen@foxvalley
labornews.com

SCHAUMBURG — When you’re shopping for eyeglasses, you may be wondering if the typical optical store at the mall accepts your insurance, and if they will give you the attention you need for your glasses or contacts.

And what about those ‘2 glasses for $100’ bargain? Is it really a good deal?

After working a few months at a major optical store, Brandon Horndasch can tell you the price advertised at the mall optical store isn’t always the price you pay.

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With a strong history of servicing union members, Eye Boutique optical centers work closely with unions through VSP insurance. It offers extended hours, weekend and holiday hours to accommodate union members. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

“They present those packages because they are a loss leader. They want to talk the customer out of the package, and to go with something more expensive,” Horndasch explained. “If they don’t have to, they really don’t want to take your insurance,” he added. Horndasch is an account manager and labor liaison for Eye Boutique.

What started as a single store in Kenosha, Wisconsin to handle the needs of UAW workers in that town, Eye Boutique has now grown into 40 stores in Wisconsin, Indiana and Illinois.

eye_boutique

Eye Boutique carries a large selection of eyewear suitable for all lifestyles, as well as a wide variety of contacts and prescription safety glasses. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Eye Boutique Sales/Marketing Representative Dan Emerick said the original Kenosha, Wisconsin store received such positive feedback from UAW members, management decided to focus on other Locals. “The next thing you know, we opened stores in Sheboygan and Janesville, Wisconsin, which led us to service Caterpillar UAW members in Peoria.”

In 2008, Eye Boutique opened its first optical store in Illinois. Among the three states, the Eye Boutique lab manufactures between 400-500 eyeglasses a day. It doesn’t source work out to different labs. “Everything we do, from anti-reflective coating to sunglass lenses to sunglass tinting — it’s all done at our lab, in-house, by UFCW Local 1473 union members,” Horndasch explained.

eye_boutique

Everything Eye Boutique does, from its anti-reflective coating, to sunglass lenses and to sunglass tinting — is all done at its lab, in-house, by UFCW Local 1473 union members. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Eye Boutique is an optical company that welcomes, with open arms, groups with insurance; including unions. Eye Boutique goes over customer benefits with the patient over the phone — an appointment isn’t needed. “We have no trouble helping customers over the phone. We can look up their insurance and give them a run-down of their benefits,” Horndasch said.

Eye Boutique has built relationships with, and work closely with, unions through VSP insurance like the UAW, Postal Workers, Letter Carriers, Teamsters, Tile Workers and the IBEW.

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With a strong focus on servicing union members, Eye Boutique understands it isn’t in the 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. market, so it offers extended hours, weekend and holiday hours to accommodate union members.

Eye Boutique carries a large selection of eyewear suitable for all lifestyles like Ray-Ban, Oakley, Coach, Nike and Flexon, as well as a wide variety of contacts. They also carries prescription safety glasses.

“We tailor to the needs of our customers,” Emerick said. “Customers who have vision benefits, we can work to create a plan for them,” he explained.

Values will determine future Illinois governor

JB Pritzker for Governor

As candidate for Illinois’ governor, JB Pritzker has decades of service to humanitarian and philanthropic endeavors. He sees issues in Springfield with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner’s reform agendas, which want to devastate the nation’s middle class and shred the social safety net for the most vulnerable, and he wants to make changes for the better. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Jennifer Rice Managing Editor

By Jennifer Rice
Managing Editor
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Email Jennifer Rice at: jen@foxvalley
labornews.com

JB Pritzker for Governor

WARRENVILLE — If you’re from Chicago, it’s likely the family name Pritzker means something to you.

It’s a name that’s synonyms with philanthropy and entrepreneurship and it’s also a name that’s seen a lot of ink on Forbes magazine’s “America’s Richest Families” list. His estimated net worth is $3.4 billion.

JB Pritzker’s happy to have his name known both ways.

While on the gubernatorial campaign trail, he was invited to Warrenville May 24 by Indivisible Naperville to field questions from its members and introduce himself as Pritzker the candidate.

JB Pritzker for Governor

Indivisible Naperville member Sandy Hill asked JB Pritzker what he thinks is the best way to retain qualified teachers. Pritzker told Hill, “If you don’t pay teachers properly, you don’t get good teachers.” Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Convincing Democrats current GOP Gov. Bruce Rauner has to be unseated in 2018 is an easy task. Convincing Democrats to replace the Republican’s “rich guy” with one of their own “rich guy” isn’t always an easy sell.

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Pritzker has an easy answer for them: the governor’s race is about values and what candidates stand for. “Before elected governor, Bruce Rauner never stood for anything. Then when he became governor, he suddenly had an agenda — a Koch brothers agenda,” Pritzker said.

Voters can chose from a number of pre-existing values Pritzker stands for, such as early childhood education, social and economic justice and historical preservation. “I grew up in a family where my parents taught me to stand up for the values we believe in,” he explained.

He says Rauner’s biggest issue is he doesn’t understand the difference in government when it comes to an expense, and an investment.

JB Pritzker for Governor

Indivisible Naperville member Sandy Hill asks gubernatorial candidate JB Pritzker what he thinks is the best way to retain qualified teachers. Hill was one of about 200 guests who traveled to Warrenville to hear Pritzker speak. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

“The expenditures of government, sometimes, are really investments in people. In business they’re not counted as investments, but in government, they really are,” he explained.

JB Pritzker for Governor

The need to keep Illinois a blue state is more important now than ever, especially after every state around Illinois wen red in 2016.

“We say, ‘thank God Illinois’ blue,” but Republicans look at it and they see a bull’s-eye,” Pritzker warned.

With a Republican governor already working the Koch brother’s agenda, it will take a full-court press to keep Right-to-Work out of Illinois.

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“Right-to-Work sounds great — if you don’t know what it is,” Pritzker said to audience laughter. “I like to say it’s Right-to-Work for less money.”

Organized labor knows the importance of keeping Right-to-Work out of Illinois. For more than a year, union members have voiced their opposition to Right-to-Work at county board meetings across the state because it is a way to cripple organized labor.

“I really believe unions helped create the middle class in this country and unions help maintain decent wages in this country,” Pritzker said.

Labor builds the foundation of the economy

Construction Industry Service Corporation

Under Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel’s leadership, Chicago has seen a construction renaissance, hosting a record number of building permits, a billion dollar renovation of CTA infrastructure, as well as the billion dollar-plus redevelopment program for both Navy Pier and the McCormick Square neighborhood. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Jennifer Rice Managing Editor

By Jennifer Rice
Managing Editor
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Email Jennifer Rice at: jen@foxvalley
labornews.com

CHICAGO — In recent years, Chicago has become first in a lot of areas.

In the short list of accomplishments, Chicago is No. 1 for corporate relocations, as well as direct foreign investments. In fact, Chicago’s economy grew faster than the United States of America and faster than New York and D.C.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel pointed out Chicago’s successes aren’t done with Wall Street or the federal government. “It’s the men and women that make up this room driving that economic growth,” he said to applause.

Emmanuel’s audience didn’t have to be convinced by his remarks. They were members of Construction Industry Service Corporation (CISCO), which makes up signatory contractors and their members.

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CISCO Executive Director Dan Allen added another Chicago accomplish. “Chicago was recently named as a top city for the most profitable start up companies in the country.

To put that into construction terms — the city had a post-recession record of 48 crane permits operating in 2016. “Each crane represents hundreds of union construction jobs helping to revitalize middle-class families,” Allen explained.

Emmanuel was CISCO’s keynote speaker for its 29th annual Luncheon.

Under Emmanuel’s leadership, Chicago has seen a construction renaissance, hosting a record number of building permits, a billion dollar renovation of CTA infrastructure, as well as the billion dollar-plus redevelopment program for both Navy Pier and the McCormick Square neighborhood.

Construction Industry Service Corporation

While speaking at a recent CISCO event, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel said making Chicago an economic success makes everyone involved a winner. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Emmanuel called Chicago’s economic strategy the 5 T’s: talent, training, transportation, technology and transparency.

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“I fundamentally believe we cannot have a 21st century economy running on a 20th century foundation. Every investment you make an infrastructure leads to greater economic growth,” Emmanuel said. That growth in Chicago is done with the best trained, best educated workforce in the building trades, he added.

Acknowledging differences, the mayor discussed the conflict between his office and the building trades, but he hopes it’s in the past. “I wasn’t [the building trades] choice in 2011. Straight up — I wasn’t. They weren’t sure what they were getting. They’re still not sure,” he said to laughs.

There were lawsuits over McCormick Place and heated meetings with leaders of various building trades. But in the end, both sides, and the City of Chicago, came out winners.
“It was because Labor was my partner in solving a problem, removing a cloud, and helping us bring business to McCormick Place,” he explained.

XPO workers in Illinois reject union representation

Aurora, Illinois XPO dockworkers

Teamsters Local 179 show support for Aurora, Illinois XPO dockworkers April 14 vote. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Fox Valley Labor News
Thursday, April 20, 2017

Elgin, Aurora workers turn thumbs down; Trenton drivers join Local 701

AURORA — XPO drivers in Trenton, New Jersey voted to join Teamsters Local 701 April 14, boosting momentum to a nationwide workers’ campaign for fairness at the giant transportation and logistics company.

Also voting April 14, drivers in Elgin, Illinois and dockworkers in Aurora, Illinois were not successful at this time seeking Teamster representation. The actions of XPO and its high-priced union busters has been egregious and suspect throughout the company’s campaigns and will be challenged through the National Labor Relations Board.

The 34 drivers in Trenton join the hundreds of workers nationwide who have already formed their union as Teamsters. The earlier victories were in Aurora (drivers); Miami; Laredo, Texas; Vernon, California; North Haven, Connecticut; and King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

“The victory in Trenton and the company’s desperate actions in Illinois show that the XPO workers’ campaign is getting stronger and stronger, as freight, warehouse and port drivers fight for a more secure future,” said Ernie Soehl, Director of the Teamsters National Freight Division, who is also President of Local 701 in North Brunswick, New Jersey. “The workers help make XPO very successful and they deserve to be rewarded for their hard work.”

The drivers are seeking decent and affordable health insurance, a secure retirement, job security and a voice on the job. Port, freight and warehouse workers at XPO are coming together across the country in their fight for a more secure future.
-International Brotherhood of Teamsters

Helping the community – 1 meal at a time

Giving Back to the Community

Members of the Lake County Building & Construction Trades Council, Great Lakes Construction Association and the Northeastern Illinois Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, participate in another year of Giving Back to the Community April 15, insert, by giving away 150 Easter ham dinners to local families in the Waukegan Public School District 60. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Jennifer Rice Managing Editor

By Jennifer Rice
Managing Editor
Thursday, April 20, 2017
Email Jennifer Rice at: jen@foxvalley
labornews.com

WAUKEGAN — Waukegan Mayor-elect Sam Cunningham felt right at home alongside union members and signatory contractors as they all came together April 15 to distributed Easter dinners to local families.

Giving Back to the Community

Union members and contractors, along with teachers and staff of Waukegan Public School District 60, took part in Giving Back to the Community April 15 outside Whittier Elementary School. Lake County union members and signatory contractors purchased enough hams, along with several sides and dessert, for 150 families to have an Easter dinner. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

“What [organized labor] is doing today is going to put them in the focal point in our community,” Cunningham explained. “This allows the public to see why it’s important to have organize labor.”

The Lake County Building and Construction Trades Council, Great Lakes Construction Association and the Northeastern Illinois Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO teamed up, as they have in the past, to purchase 150 Easter dinners for residents of Waukegan Public School District 60. It was part of their Giving Back to the Community project.

Pete Olson, president of the Lake County Building and Construction Trades Council said the event allows the community to see unions for what they really are — a supportive and integral part of the community.

It’s also a way to show their appreciation to the Waukegan Public School District for work awarded to signatory contractors, which have put many union members to work.

“It also shows we’re here to support each other, like we were when the teachers went on strike a few years ago,” said Olsen. “We’re all under the umbrella of the Northeastern Illinois Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO.”

Giving Back to the Community

If local families were unable to drive to the donation spot, transportation was provided by the school district and buses were sent to them at various pick-up points. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Giving Back to the Community

After local families received their dinners, they were treated to doughnuts and coffee. If needed, they were helped back to their vehicle with their items. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Giving Back to the Community

Pete Olson, president of the Lake County Building Trades chats with volunteers Sue and Jamie Boller with Boller Construction. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

The distribution site was at Whittier Elementary School from 10 a.m. to noon. For families unable to find transportation, the school district used school buses to pick up residents at certain destination pick-up spots.

Great Lakes Construction Association Executive Vice President Tim Marabella said he loves helping out in his community. “I really love that aspect of my job,” Marabella explained.

Signatory Contractor Boller Construction provided a box truck to pick up the dinners. Family members Sue and Jamie Boller welcomed residents, offering them doughnuts and coffee. Fellow family member Matt Boller, along with Local 150 Training Director Bryan Sorensen, worked inside the box truck getting the hams ready.

“We are big supporters of the Great Lakes Contractors Association,” Matt said. “Whenever they need help, we’ll jump at it.”

Any extra meals were distributed to various community organizations, including Most Blessed Trinity Parish.

IBEW members light the way for food pantry volunteers

Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry

The Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry gets a mini-facelift for interior lighting, heating and more, courtesy of a local grant and the dedication of organized labor. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Jennifer Rice Managing Editor

By Jennifer Rice
Managing Editor
Thursday, March 9, 2017
Email Jennifer Rice at: jen@foxvalley
labornews.com

AURORA — The dedicated volunteers at the Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry had been working in the pantry’s warehouse with limited lighting, while office personnel worked on the second level in offices with no heat.

But with a grant from the Community Foundation of the Fox River Valley along with pro bono work from organized labor, volunteers can now navigate the warehouse in ample light and employees don’t have to wear coats at their desks.

“We’re just so grateful to the Foundation and to the union members,” said Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry Executive Director Marilyn Weisner.

Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry

IBEW Local 461 Assistant Business Manager/Organizer Shaun Thomas and 4th year apprentice Bryan Cotes install conduit in the bar joist of the warehouse. This will prevent the conduit from getting damaged by the mast of forklifts when they pull product down. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry

IBEW 461 member Burt Jones assembles a ceiling fan. Ten fans were installed to allow for better air flow in the warehouse. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

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In the warehouse, IBEW Local 461 installed ceiling fans, replaced damaged conduit and moved lighting into the aisles. For the upstairs offices, baseboard heaters were installed.

The circuitry needed for the baseboard heaters wasn’t in the offices, so it was pipped in from the back of the warehouse to circuits near the offices. Even with a heat diffuser on the second floor, it’s primary purpose is to heat up the area near the front entrance, keeping the windows from fogging up. What it didn’t do was bring heat to the back offices.

The work was done during the week the pantry was closed between Christmas and New Year.

Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry

Aurora Area Interfaith Food Pantry volunteers work in an aisle of the warehouse with plenty of light. Jennifer Rice/staff photographer

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Along with donating labor, affiliates from the Fox Valley Building Trades donated various needed materials and money. SMART Local 265 donated a scissor lift. With the various donations, the pantry was able to use funds earmarked to pay for labor and apply it to other portions of the grant that weren’t necessarily funded.

IBEW Local 461 Assistant Business Manager/Organizer Shaun Thomas said organized labor was more than willing to help the pantry. “In general, unions frequently donate materials and volunteer their time in the community.”

Every year, members from the building trades volunteer to distribute food from the pantry’s mobile food pantry to seniors at local retirement homes.

Members return to work after on strike for 44 days

Strike ends for Teamsters Local 710

Members of Teamsters Local 710 stood their ground day and night on the strike line at Railway Industrial Services in Crest Hill to secure a contract that supports their dedication to their jobs. They stood strong for 44 days and ratified a new three-year contract. They returned to work March 2. Photo courtesy of Teamsters Local 710

Fox Valley Labor News
Thursday, March 2, 2017

CREST HILL — The 70 persistent Local 710 Teamsters at Railway Industrial Services have finally secured the benefits they fought for throughout their 44-day long strike and ratified a new three-year contract. They returned to work March 2.

The railway maintenance workers have remained strong on the picket line since Jan. 17 after negotiations reached a standstill.

Enduring a spectrum of harsh weather from subzero wind chills to a severe thunderstorm just last night, they stood their ground day and night to secure a contract that supports their dedication to their jobs.

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“You would be hard pressed to find a group more dedicated than these men,” said Local 710 Business Agent Mike Ramirez.

Their unified stance didn’t falter once, and the atmosphere on the picket line was always positive, no matter how hard RIS pushed. Their persistence has finally paid off, and they have won a strong contract,” Ramirez added.

The Local 710 Bargaining Committee returned to the bargaining table Feb. 22 with optimism, but left with extreme disappointment after RIS made only minor changes to the company’s previous offer. At that time, the Teamsters received a letter from RIS, which withdrew management’s last, best and final offer, a seemingly positive move the company had refused to make during the first month of the ongoing labor action.

Strike ends for Teamsters Local 710

Teamsters Local 710 members are back to work at Railway Industrial Services. They returned to work March 2 after standing strong on the picket line for 44 days and securing a strong Local 710 contract. Photo courtesy of Teamsters Local 710

One of the most important issues for the membership was the cost of healthcare. Local 710 successfully secured a cap on employee contributions towards the monthly premium. Along with that, hourly wages will increase more than five percent on average over the life of the agreement.

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Additional language throughout the contract was also strengthened to better protect the members’ rights in the workplace.

They will now be able to use some vacation days as sick days without disciplinary action. Discipline, which previously had no structure, was adjusted to be progressive with multiple steps.

Upon moving up to a higher job classification, members will immediately receive the higher rate of pay for that job, whereas before, that increase was spread out over five years.

“On behalf of Local 710 and the entire Joint Council 25, I want to extend our congratulations to these men on a battle well fought, said Local 710 Trustee John T. Coli. “They fully embody what it means to be a Teamster, and their solidarity is so incredibly impressive and inspiring to all union members. Well done,” Coli added.
—Teamsters Local 710